Make it a Marquette Weekend

Things to Do: In and Around Downtown Marquette

There are plenty of things to see and do in Marquette here are a few options to get you started.

Downtown Marquette
There are a number of historical and architectural points of interest in the Downtown District. To get a lay of the land and download a map that includes historical markers, trails, parks and other points of interest visit http://www.eyeonmichigan.com/guides/marquette/maps.php

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Marquette County Courthouse,
400 S. Third Street, Marquette

The Marquette County Courthouse, 400 S. Third St., this Neo-Classical Revival structure, completed in 1904, is largely comprised of regional Portage Entry sandstone. The building has served as the setting for a number of historically significant trials and was featured in the film Anatomy of Murder. The building offers terrific views inside and out. If only these walls could talk!

Book World, 136 W. Washington St., features all the news that is fit to print, as well as books by local authors. Visit http://bookworldstores.com/showLoc.php?id=44 to learn more.

Stop into Dead River Coffee http://deadrivercoffee.com/, 119 Baraga Avenue, Theo’s local in house roasts are sure to please. Learn more about Theo and Dead River Coffee by visiting http://www.mrbigfilm.com/deadrivercoffee.html.

Hotel Janzen 146 W. Spring Street, Marquette

Hotel Janzen, 146 W. Spring Street, Marquette

Hotel Jansen, 146 W. Spring St., of all the railroad hotels once located in this area, Hotel Janzen, built in the 1890’s, is the only structure of its kind that remains. Since 1894 this Late Victorian structure has operated as a low income shelter.

Wells Fargo Bank, 101 W. Washington St., a 1927 Beau Arts Building, exudes luxury both inside and out.Visit

Wattsson and Wattsson Jewelers, 118 W. Washington St., and tour the amazing onsite goldmine. This dazzling mine features displays on mining history, Rope’s Gold Mine, artifacts, and a case with minerals that glow under special lighting, http://wandwjewelers.com/index.php?route=information/information&information_id=7 .

Bishop Baraga House, 615 S. Fourth St., became the home of Bishop Baraga in 1866. For more information about Bishop Baraga visit http://www.dioceseofmarquette.org/index.php?pageid=747&whatmenu=736

Old City Hall, Marquette 204 W. Washington St

Old City Hall, Marquette
204 W. Washington St

Old City Hall, 204 W. Washington St., was
designated a Michigan State Historic Site in
1974 and placed on the National Register of
Historic Places that same year. The building
was completed in 1894 and was used by the
city until 1977.

Marquette County Savings Bank, 125 W. Washington St., a Queen Anne structure, was completed by in 1892. The carved stone ornamental façade gives clues to its history. The Building features an eight-day, Howard clock tower.

The Harlow Block, on the corner of Front St. and Washington St., built in 1887, features a sandstone façade and currently houses both retail and office spaces.

The Burt House, 220 Craig Street, constructed of broken rock from the stone quarry was the first permanent building to be erected in Marquette http://createwithkim.com/2008/07/09/john-burt-house-marquette-michigan/.

Donckers, 137 W. Washington Street

Donkers, 137 W. Washington Street

Sweets, Treats and More

Donkers, 137 W. Washington St., family
owned and operated since 1896. This old
fashioned candy counter, soda fountain, and
full service restaurant is not to be missed.
Be sure to get some homemade salted
caramels for the road. Learn more about the
history behind this Marquette original
http://www.donckersonline.com/experience.php.

Babycakes Muffin Company, 223 W. Washington St., offers a variety of delightful made from scratch muffins on a daily basis. Legend has it that the owner, Kim Danielson, used to make her son muffins to take to school. The muffins were a hit and her baby’s cakes became the inspiration for Babycakes.

Marquette Baking Company, 117 W. Baraga Avenue, Peter Claybaker’s fascination with bread began with a sourdough starter. Years of experimentation and passion are evident in his offerings today! Stop in and see how good bread can be. Don’t miss a chance to try the cayenne parmesan breadsticks.

Gophers Café and Bakery, 910 N. Third St., is the place to go if you have a craving for decadence and cake. Layers of rich buttercream grace slices of buttery cake in flavors from chocolate raspberry, to vanilla kirsch.

For a full list of dining options in Marquette’s Downtown District visit www.downtownmarquette.org.

Views

Drive, bike or hike to the top of Marquette Mountain, and see the lay of the land below! Head East on U.S. 41 by car, from the traffic circle you will continue east on U.S. 41 and drive 1.5 miles to Cliff Power Road and turn right. Follow Cliff Power Road for .05 miles to Marquette Mountain Road and turn right. Visit this map http://www.eyeonmichigan.com/guides/marquette/maps.php?map=1 for further details.

Sugarloaf Mountain http://hunts-upguide.com/on_the_way_to_big_bay_sugarloaf_mountain.html#.UWRmK5OG18E is a quick drive up Country Road 550. A short hike up a well-worn path will take you to the top of Sugarloaf, where you will be rewarded with majestic vistas of Marquette’s shoreline and Lake Superior.

Biking

Marquette - Bike Against SunsetLakeshore Bike Path Enjoy a ride along a picturesque bike path that runs along Lake Superior. The paved path extends five miles north from Downtown Marquette. Along the way you will see numerous sights including the Marquette Lighthouse, McCarty’s Cove – a popular swimming beach in the summer months, Picnic Rocks, as well as the still operational Ore Dock. If you are lucky, you might catch a glimpse of a lady of the lake as it loads up with iron ore http://www.travelmarquettemichigan.com/recreation/ore-boats/.

swimmersJust beyond the ore dock, you will find yourself at Presque Isle. Presque Isle, http://www.michigandnr.com/publications/pdfs/wildlife/viewingguide/up/19Presque/, boasts a myriad of hiking trails, where you will have the opportunity to take in views of rugged cliff faces and perhaps encounter an albino deer!  As soon as the weather heats up these black rocks buzz with activity. Thrill seekers of all ages climb these ancient basalt rock formations to jump off a cliff and plunge into the icy waters below http://www.thingstodointheup.com/black-rocks-marquette/.

If you find yourself at Presque Isle in the evening, make sure to make it to Sunset Point. Sunset Point offers views of the setting sun as well as views of Middle Island Point, home to a number of historic cottages including Midgaard, http://michiganmodern.org/2012/09/25/midgaard-lautner-cottage/, the Lautner Family Cottage.

Lakeshore Bike, 505 Lakeshore Boulevard, just west of the lighthouse, (906) 228-7547 This general bike shop also rents bikes – “cruisers” and tandems for the flat bike path ($7/hour or $35/day) and mountain bikes ($35/day). Free bike maps of developed trails and bike paths around the city can be picked up here, and the staff is happy to advise visiting bicyclists, too.

Quick Stop Bike Shop, 1100 N. Third St., located near the campus of Northern Michigan University, (906)-225 -1577 Friendly and helpful service complement $35/day mountain bikes rentals.

For more detailed information about biking and area trails visit http://letsbikemqt.com/maps/.

Work Out  

Snap Fitness, http://www.snapfitness.com/gyms/marquette-mi-49855/1812, located within walking distance from both of the conference hotels and in the heart of Downtown Marquette’s historic district, Snap Fitness is a convenient place to get a workout in.

Conveniently located on the campus of Northern Michigan University, The Physical Education Instructional Facility, also known as the PEIF, http://www.nmuwildcats.com/information/peif, offers a climbing wall, weight room, cardiovascular area, two basketball courts, two lounge areas, and spinning room.

Superior Dome, NMU Campus

Superior Dome, NMU Campus

The Superior Dome http://www.nmu.edu/sportsrecsports/node/113 is connected to the PEIF and home to a number of NMU Sports. In the “Book of World Records – 2010,” the Superior Dome is listed as the fifth-largest dome structure in the world (largest being measured by diameter). The four other structures that are larger are made of steel, making it the largest wooden dome structure. The facility has a diameter of 536 feet. It has the ability to withstand 60 pounds per square foot of snow and 80 mile per hour winds.

Brews

The Vierling Restaurant, 119 S. Front Street

The Vierling Restaurant, 119 S. Front Street

Downtown Marquette is home to three brew pubs making it a beer lover’s paradise. Stop into the Vierling, 119 S. Front St., and try a Blueberry Wheat beer. This crowd pleasing light beer dances with blueberries and tantalizes the taste buds. The Vierling, a full service restaurant, features a great menu that includes fresh Lake Superior Whitefish. Learn more at http://www.thevierling.com.

Blackrocks Brewery, 424 N. Third StreetThe Ore Dock Brewing Company, 114 Spring Street, located just within sight of the Lower Harbor Ore Dock offers great beer and ambiance. Try a Saison or Dream Weaver, a Belgian Style Amber, and you will not be disappointed. To learn more about the brewery visit http://ore-dock.com/.

Blackrocks (Nano) Brewery, 424 N. Third St., fulfilled a long time dream of two friends and home brewers when it opened in 2010. Over the years they have brewed over a hundred varieties and they continue to please throngs of beer lovers with small and surprising batches to this day http://www.blackrocksbrewery.com

Sightseeing and other Cultural Excursions

Harlow's Wooden Man

Harlow’s Wooden Man

Harlow’s Wooden Man, 200 block of S. Fifth Street, a cedar tree trunk sculpture that was made by Amos Harlow, who came to Marquette in 1849. The “wooden man” was created in the 1870s, and still stands in its original location.

The Oasis Art Gallery, 130 W. Washington St., is a co-operative art gallery that features the work of contemporary artists. Exhibitions change every month.

Zero Degrees Art Gallery, 525 N. Third St., presents works by established and emerging local artists. The gallery aims to create a dynamic and diverse community of artists for the purpose of supporting, celebrating and sharing art, while providing a year-round retail location for artists to show their work.  On display you will find a wide range of artisan crafts and fine art including ceramics, fiber, greeting cards, jewelry, mixed media, painting, illustration, woodworking, photography, and sculpture.  Visit http://www.zerodegreesgallery.com/.

Lakenenland, , located about 15 miles out of town on M-28 this sculpture park exudes imagination and creativity. Using all recycled scrap material Tom Lakenen has built a world of wonder that will no doubt delight children and adults alike. Visit http://www.lakenenland.com/gallery.html to learn more.

Father Marquette Statue

Father Marquette Statue

Father Marquette Statue, 400 block of S. Front St., a bronze statue sculpted by Gaetano Trentanove of Florence Italy and was dedicated to the city of Marquette on July 15, 1897. The restoration of this stature has been possible through the fundraising efforts of the Marquette Beautification Committee.  A presentation of the restoration will be held in conjunction with the anniversary of the statue on July 15, 2013.

The Upper Peninsula Children’s Museum, 123 W. Braga Ave., offers a variety of opportunities through its hands-on exhibits which were ALL DESIGNED BY KIDS for everyone.  Hundreds of children were taken through over twenty design processes (called Design-o-saurus participatory design processes) resulting in unique and whimsical exhibit designs not found in any other museum. Exhibit halls include The World of Science and Nature, The Incredible Journey, Over the Air and Micro Society. Visit http://www.upchildrensmuseum.com/  for more information.

DeVos Art Museum, located at the corner of Tracy and Seventh St., on the campus on Northern Michigan University, is part of the School of Art and Design at NMU and also serves as a regional art museum for the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  Visit http://art.nmu.edu/department/museum/ to learn more about current exhibitions and events.

  

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